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Thursday, May 31, 2012

"Our Lady of Britannia"......

is a poem written in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and it refers to the many incidences in which she manifested herself in the cultural history of The British Isles. This I post in Mary's month of May.


Our Lady of Britannia


Thou stood on Newgate Arch and graced Pendragon’s shield
Cardigan bore thy taper and Walsingham thy seal
Humbly we now beseech thee as at thy feet we kneel:
Our Lady of Britannia, ora pro nobis!

From Scotia’s misty moors, to Albion’s fertile plains,
From Cambria’s mountain climes, to Northern Erin's glens,
We offer thee this land to be thy own again
Our Lady of Britannia, ora pro nobis

When Alfred led his warriors to battle for the land
Within the White Horse Valley, thou gave him strength to stand
Seven Swords were pierced through thy heart, and one was in thy hand
Our Lady of Britannia, ora pro nobis!

Thy hands are in the Highlands to show us how to pray
Thy footprints are in Cornwall to guide us in Christ’s ways
Direct us, Holy Virgin, if God forbid we stray
Our Lady of Britannia, ora pro nobis!

Thy beads hung from the sword-belts of Locksley’s Merry Men
Thy hymns were sung by choirs, O Mother Free from Sin
This land was once thy Dowry; pray make it so again
Our Lady of Britannia, ora pro nobis!

Thy name was oft times chanted by peasants and bold knights
Preparing for the harvest, or arming for the fight
Though centuries have elapsed, thou’st kept us in thy sight
Our Lady of Britannia, ora pro nobis!

Thou art the Dove of Peace for Ulster’s troubled sons,
The Queen of Thorns and Blossoms, whose seat was Avalon
Look down on us from Heaven, Most Highly Favored One
Our Lady of Britannia, ora pro nobis!

Through persecution’s fury, thou still remained the same,
A constant source of succor to those who called thy name
Thou art the Gilded Lamp that held the Burning Flame
Our Lady of Britannia, ora pro nobis!

Recall the martyrs’ deaths in Christ’s own imitation
Come rack and then come rope, they braved the tribulation
The ruby blood they shed cries out in supplication:
Our Lady of Britannia, ora pro nobis!

Remember this, thy country, amidst the stormy sea
O may she stand united, a stronghold for the free
But foremost make her faithful to Jesus Christ and thee
Our Lady of Britannia, ora pro nobis!



Our Lady of Britannia


21 comments:

  1. A beautiful poem: well done. I have just read it, on this eve of the start of celebrations for the Diamond Jubilee of HM Queen Elizabeth II, and it makes a fitting prayer for our country. Britain is troubled by the abandonment of spiritual and moral truths - there could be very difficult times ahead. Thank you for this touching prayer-poem.

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  2. Hi, I am finally getting to comment on your blog! You have been doing a great job and I've enjoyed reading it. I really liked the last stanza of this poem. Do you by any chance know who wrote it?

    - Katherine

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  3. Hello, Mrs. Bogle!

    Many thanks for reading my poem and posting your kind comment. You and your blog have always been inspirations to me, and I always keep you in my prayers.

    I believe it is people like you who are the last best hope for Britian.

    Pax Tecum,
    Pearl of Tyburn

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  4. Hi, Katherine!

    So happy you finally were able to comment. Please feel free to do so whenever something on the blog strikes your interest.

    Yep, the last stanza is my favorite, too. Just to let you know, the author is yours truly ;-) Thank you for the compliment!

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    1. Really? That's great! : ) Do you write a lot of poetry? As you probably already know, I do all the time.
      Thank you! I certainly will be keeping an eye on your blog when I can.
      - Katherine

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  5. YOU wrote that!? Officially impressed.

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  6. Lovely poem, (came here via auntie joanna's blog). Reading your poem fills me with nostalgia for Britain of the 1950's and school days learning British History and Churches packed on Sundays, May processions and Devotions. How did we let it all fade away?
    But since our God is a God of hope, I hope for better days ahead.
    Best wishes from Canada

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  7. Good Evening, all!

    @Katherine: Well, I spend most of my writing time creating fiction stories or typing out non-fiction articles. However, I do write some poems/songs when I get inspired by a certain topic or come up with a catchy tune. How about you? What sort of poetry do you usually write? I believe I read one of your poems on HLQ about the beauty of snow, correct?

    @Emerald: Wow! I'm officially impressed that you're officially impressed! LOL! Thank you ever so much ;-)

    @Elizabeth: Welcome to the blog! Thank you for reading; I'm glad you found the poem enjoyable. The memories of the simple beauty of the old days must be bitter-sweet....One thing I would say is that the British and Commonwealthers have always impressed me by the way they "never say die". Since we are Catholics, we have all the more reason to never loose hope. Things are always the darkest before dawn. The fight is on.

    Please visit again soon!

    God Bless,
    Pearl

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  8. Well and truly said!

    - Mack in Texas

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  9. Wow! Lovely and truly impressive poem, my friend!

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  10. Hi Pearl, yes I did have a poem on the HLQ about snow! I had three others published on there at various times and I think the three of them were in some way or other religious. I would say that the majority of my poetry is religious but, like you, I am open to other inspirations!
    Anyway, this was the first time I've read any of your poetry, having previously enjoyed your story on the HLQ, and I greatly enjoyed it! Hope you post some more sometime!

    -Katherine

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  11. Beautiful poem, Pearl! You wrote that?! You should consider putting it to music sometime:-)

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  12. Thank you all very much for your kind comments and encouragment. I appreciate your taking the time to participate in this blog, and I value your opinions.

    Actually, the poem is also a song. I wrote a tune several years ago to accompany an old Scottish poem. Then, at the wise suggestion of my father, I wrote the "Our Lady of Britannia" lyrics in a rhythm that could be accompanied with the same tune.

    It worked out quite well, so it can be sung as a song as well as read as a poem :-)

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  13. You're amazing, Pearl! I've only been able to write maybe two original tunes in my life (at least that I didn't forget as soon as I invented them!) so I am very, very impressed! Wish I could hear the song!
    - Katherine

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  14. This prayer is great, Pearl! I'm so glad I got to read it. I especially loved the reference to Chesterton's Ballad: "And seven swords were in her heart - but one was in her hand". Thank you so much for posting this.
    -Ian K.

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  15. Thanks, Katherine and Ian!

    @Katherine: I'm about in the same boat as you as far as original tunes go! I've only come up with about three or four, and only one or two worked out well with my voice. Probably the best one I came up with was the one I'm using for this poem. Have you ever tried coming up with tunes to do with your lovely poetry?

    @Ian: Welcome to the blog! Thanks for stopping by, and I'm glad you enjoyed the prayer-poem :-) You got it right about "The Ballad of the White Horse" reference. When I read that snippet, I was so inspired I incorporated it into the song. Have you read the whole Chesteron "Ballad"? I have only read parts, but I assume I'll have to read it through for literature eventually.

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  16. I'm sorry Pearl, this one slipped past me. It is magnificent, thank you.
    Also, it is very unusual for anyone to highlight Our Lady of the Taper, so double thanks.
    Richard

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  17. Wonderful poem Pearl - well done!

    You must have been working at it for ages!

    "Our Lady of Britannia" is a lovely thought - though I can think of a few people in Britain who might recoil at the mention lol

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  18. Hi Pearl, thanks for the compliment about my poetry! Yes, most of the tunes I've tried to create were for poems, particuarly those intended as hymns.
    Hope to read another of your poems sometime!

    -Katherine

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  19. Hello Pearl

    I saw this poem on Stabat Mater blog & I was bowled over by its beauty. Now I am bowled over again (twice in one day!) to learn that you wrote it. You are amazing. I have posted Richard's link on my facebook page & I will, if you don't mind, also post a link to this blog. Thanks again & keep up the beautiful work. God bless you.

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  20. Thank you, Richard, GWright, Katherine, and breadgirl for your kind words!

    Richard, it is sad how Our Lady of Cardigan gets skipped over in poetry so much. Do you know of any Welsh poems in her honor? After all, Welsh is almost the quintessential language of poetry -in my mind, at least!

    Indeed, GWright, it took me about a year of writing and rewriting to get it down the way I wanted it, and there are loads of sticky notes around the house with primative scrawlings of lyrics in the making!

    Katherine, if you have anything particular poetry written for publication, I'd be happy to feature it on a blog post some time, if you'd be interested.

    Breadgirl, I'm so glad you were moved by my poem in honor of Our Lady of Britannia. Feel free to advertise it at will.

    God Bless,
    Pearl

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